Programmes

SysMO is a European transnational funding and research initiative on "Systems Biology of Microorganisms".

The goal pursued by SysMO was to record and describe the dynamic molecular processes going on in unicellular microorganisms in a comprehensive way and to present these processes in the form of computerized mathematical models.

Systems biology will raise biomedical and biotechnological research to a new quality level and contribute markedly to progress in understanding. Pooling European research
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Projects: BaCell-SysMO, COSMIC, SUMO, KOSMOBAC, SysMO-LAB, PSYSMO, SCaRAB, MOSES, TRANSLUCENT, STREAM, SulfoSys, SysMO DB, SysMO Funders, SilicoTryp, Noisy-Strep

Web page: http://sysmo.net/

The currently used mathematical models for medical treatment at the individual or population level are largely phenomenological and have limited quantitative predictive power. It is usually not possible to predict the effect of an intervention in a specific process or to predict the effect of a pharmaceutical drug since the step or enzyme on which the intervention/drug works is not explicit in the model.

Taking HIV pathogenesis as an example, the immune system response, vaccine exposure, and drug
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Projects: Whole body modelling of glucose metabolism in malaria patients

Web page: http://sacemaquarterly.com/mathematical-modelling/sarchi-project-mechanistic-modelling-health-epidemiology.html

SynthSys is the University of Edinburgh's research organisation in interdisciplinary, Synthetic and Systems Biology, founded in 2012 as the successor to the Centre for Systems Biology at Edinburgh.

Projects: Millar group, TiMet

Web page: http://www.synthsys.ed.ac.uk

SAFE-Aqua (SustainAble Farming for Effective Aquaculture) is an international consortium research project, consisting of a group of multidisciplinary experts from leading research institutes in France, UK, Thailand and a private-company in Spain.

Projects: SAFE-Aqua

Web page: http://www.safeaqua-project.net

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